Tuesday, October 16, 2007

Getting nervous


In the last few days I have begun to investigate the jobs that I need to do whilst I am replacing the kitchen because there area few that I have not previously tackled. It looks as though I am going to be learning a lot and hopefully not only from mistakes...
Fitting a new tap - no idea
Re-plumbing the sink and dishwasher - seems logical, but never done it before
Installing electrical outlets - never done it before and apparently illegal to do it myself. (Easy)
Laying floorboards - should be easy
Tiling - could be a disaster
Laying vinyl floor - could be an expensive disaster
So if anyone has any great advice about any of these (other than getting in a professional) then please let me know.

15 comments:

  1. Anonymous2:26 pm

    Leave the plumbing until aj & m arrive.
    We've attempted most things, with varying degrees of success.
    By the way, do you have plenty of old, large towels?
    m

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  2. Anonymous3:06 pm

    Heaven forbid that someone may have anything supportive to say or at least a little faith in my abilities. Please bring on the insults and critisism that I apparently so richly deserve.

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  3. Anonymous6:47 pm

    Vinyl is easy, it`s just floating on the floor, and the resturant in Soro will be open.

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  4. Anonymous7:30 pm

    hire an amateur and live with the problems !

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  5. Anonymous7:31 pm

    On second thoughts why not employ a consultant!

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  6. Anonymous9:12 pm

    Shall I bring the Reader's Digest 'How to do Anything Around the House.' book ? ajen

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  7. Anonymous9:17 pm

    Warm vinyl tiles in a cool oven - a whole pile of them then you can cut them with scissors - around doors etc. They should be layed with a specific side up and the grain should alternate 90 degrees - ie lay one one way and the next one perpendicular to it.
    MOST IMPORTANTLY - the first tile you lay will dictate EVERYTHING so find the centre of the room in each direction and draw a cross - the cross becomes the join of the tiles and your cuts at the edge should be similar sizes - instead of needing a whole row of 2mm tiles on one side and cutting 2mm of full tiles on the other side.
    THING IT ALL OUT before you lay a single tile because once you start you are committed.
    WRM

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  8. Anonymous9:31 pm

    You should just make sure that you have a good insurance policy so that when you have destroyed the kitchen, you can torch the house and start again!

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  9. Karen9:36 pm

    Lars put tiles in our bathroom in Valby - never done it before either, but it turned out really well. Advise no 1: Rent a good electrical tile cutter! No 2: Use small "space crosses" to ensure even spacing between the tiles. We can help with: 1 very helpful and very silly video on how to do tiles (by Silvan!), several tools and lots of space crosses to use for it. We will bring it to G-vej on demand :-)

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  10. Anonymous7:39 am

    I am sure that a fine mozaic kitchen will soon be produced!

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  11. The vinyl floor is off a roll, not tiles so one cut in the wrong place could be the end of it. I have read a guide and it seems reasonably simple. The wall tiling could be a challengs, but I will either use big tiles (fewer of them) or mosaic tiles that come in a sheet...

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  12. Anonymous11:42 am

    Well! Show your inadequacies & the comments pour in, as usual.
    Now we know that it is sheet vinyl, I'm sure that WRM will relive his earliest experience in vinyl - removed the old floor covering, placed it on top of the new, on the back lawn & cut around it.
    Easy. Hey presto. A mirror image!
    We did salvage enough to use in the toilet.
    K & L sound your best bet, next to aj, m & the Readers' Digest DIY manual, of course.
    Have a good day.
    m

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  13. Anonymous9:57 pm

    Sheet vinyl if a total b**** to lay. it will change dimension and laying temperature is important. take a tip - the pros get it wrong occasionally. you might fluke it but why take the risk? Think about living with the new kitchen for years or the premium it will add to the pad. Short term cost is not a good measure G

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  14. Anonymous10:01 pm

    vinyl whether tles or sheet is generally best laid decorative side up!

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  15. Anonymous11:12 pm

    As are women.

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